Michel De Montaigne
“The value of life lies not in the length of days, but in the use we make of them.”-Michel De Montaigne

Mind Articles Q3 2012(8)

Why Backbends?

Sep 24, 2012

Because our emotions are stored in the back. Any backbend is a good one for letting go of feelings that have been overwhelming you. Backbends also help to relieve physical pain, help your digestive function, promote kidney function and help let go of fear and stress. Lift your heart and brighten your day with this short backbending sequence. Click on Read More: "Mindful Body."

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The Health Benefits of Meditation

The Health Benefits of Meditation

Sep 19, 2012

The health benefits of meditation Science shows meditation offers many health benefits, including making you healthier and happier. Here's one of the simplest forms of mediation – A Body Scan Meditation A Body Scan Meditation can help you become aware of what you are feeling and teach you how to release stress in your body and mind. More benefits from the Mayo Clinic: According to the Mayo Clinic, benefits of meditation include a sense of balance and peace, reduced stress, a more positive state of mind and greater self-awareness. Meditation is acknowledged as possibly helping allergies, asthma, cancer, depression and insomnia, among other health conditions. Who would disagree that lying on your back for half an hour a day and checking in with your body in a non-judgmental way could be anything but beneficial? Try a quick 5-minute Body Scan Meditation right now by clicking Read More "Mindful Body"

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How Healthy Is Your Breathing?

Aug 13, 2012

How Healthy Is Your Breathing? Take these simple tests and determine if you can benefit from breath exercises. Breath Holding Holding one's breath after inhaling may be the most common poor breathing habit. To determine if you do this, pay attention to the transition from inhalation to exhalation. A breath-holder usually feels a "catch" and may actually struggle to initiate the exhalation. This tendency is particularly noticeable during exercise. You can reduce the holding by consciously relaxing your abdomen just as an inhalation ends. Upper-Chest Breathing Lie on your back, placing one hand on your upper chest and the other on your abdomen. If the hand on your chest moves as you breathe but the one on the abdomen does not, you're definitely a chest-breather. Shallow Breathing Lie on your back and place your hands around your lower ribs. You should feel an effortless expansion of the lower ribs on the breath in and a slow recoil on the breath out. If your ribs remain motionless, your breathing is too shallow, even if your belly moves. Overbreathing Lie down and take a few minutes to let your body establish its relaxed breathing rate. Then count the length of your next exhalation and compare it to the length of the following inhalation. The exhalation should be slightly longer. If not, you are an overbreather. Mouth Breathing It's fairly easy to notice if you're a mouth-breather; if you're not sure, ask your friends or try to catch yourself at unguarded moments. Try out new video, “Full Yogic Breath” and other breathing exercises: http://www.mindfulbody.com/mind/breath

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Loving Kindness Meditation

Loving Kindness Meditation

Aug 6, 2012

Meditation Changes the Brain - It helps to reduces stress, anxiety and depression; helps to lower blood pressure and slow the rate of aging; increases alertness and stimulates the relaxation response. Try out a Loving Kindness Meditation Practice- it will help you stay positive towards yourself and others. This meditation will help to keep you calm in difficult situations and help to dissolve anger and bitterness from the past.

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The ‘Busy’ Trap

Aug 1, 2012

It’s become the default response when you ask anyone how they’re doing: “Busy!” “So busy.” “Crazy busy.” It is, pretty obviously, a boast disguised as a complaint. The present hysteria is not a necessary or inevitable condition of life; it’s something we’ve chosen, if only by our acquiescence to it. Busyness serves as a kind of existential reassurance, a hedge against emptiness; obviously your life cannot possibly be silly or trivial or meaningless if you are so busy, completely booked, in demand every hour of the day. BUT: Idleness is not just a vacation, an indulgence or a vice; it is as indispensable to the brain as vitamin D is to the body, and deprived of it we suffer a mental affliction as disfiguring as rickets. The space and quiet that idleness provides is a necessary condition for standing back from life and seeing it whole, for making unexpected connections and waiting for the wild summer lightning strikes of inspiration — it is, paradoxically, necessary to getting any work done.

Source: The New York Times

Feeling Anxious, Stressed...

Feeling Anxious, Stressed...

Aug 1, 2012

Try out the Lion's Breath Practice. It is one of the most powerful breathing techniques known to reduce tension, stress and let go of negative thoughts and emotions. It's also fun, funny and will most likely leave you laughing and feeling lighter.

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Movement Meditation: Centering Breath

Jul 27, 2012

The following meditation is based upon the opening movements of Surya Namaskar or Sun Salutation. The linking of the breath with the archetypal arm movements—expanding the arms upward on the inhalation and then contracting them down the center line of your spine on the exhalation—taps into the basic rhythm of life that defines our moment-to-moment reality. Our breath and our heartbeat both follow this expand-and-contract movement. The grounding force of gravity which is part of apana or "downward force" corresponds with the pulling of the arms toward the earth; a rebound effect is felt in the drawing upwards of the arms with the inhalation. This meditation can be done while seated or standing. To begin, bring your hands together at your heart, in anjali mudra. Take a moment to become receptive by shifting from thinking mind to listening mind. Scan your body and mind and ask yourself how you are feeling. Take note of the answer (scattered, irritated, tired, excited) without investing or analyzing the content. Now, on an inhalation, draw your arms overhead from the roots of your feet. Coordinate your breath with the movement so that at the top of your inhalation, your hands come together overhead. As you exhale, draw your arms down the center line of your spine so that your arms rest beside your hips when you complete your exhalation. Repeat this rhythm, drawing upward on the inhalation and downward on the exhalation for as long as it feels appropriate, probably somewhere between three to five minutes. Concentrate on merging your breath and movement and being present every moment. Notice as your movement and breath start to syncopate that your internal state begins to shift. As your breath slows down with the grace of your movement, feel your inner balance returning. When you feel a natural urge to end, take one last cycle with the arms and then draw your hands together at your heart. Take a few moments of to quietly reflect before returning to the movements of your life, more centered and enlivened by your movement meditation.

Source: Yoga Journal

Watch New Video: Mindful Meditation Practice

Watch New Video: Mindful Meditation Practice

Jul 18, 2012

Mindful meditation helps deepen awareness, its aim is to help you see things as they really are, more clearly. It involves focusing on your mind on the present. To be mindful is to be aware of your thoughts and actions in the present, without judging yourself.

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