Viktor E. Frankl
Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.-Viktor E. Frankl

Mind Articles Q2 2012(8)

Watch New Video: The Relaxing Breath Practice

Jun 8, 2012

The Relaxing Breath is one of the most powerful relaxation methods - it is a natural tranquilizer for the nervous system. You can use this breath anytime you feel stressed or upset. The relaxing breath will help you calm down so you don't automatically react, you will feel more space as you deal with the situation that is causing you to feel stressed or upset. This breath can also be used anytime you feel tension in your body or if you are having trouble falling asleep.

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Watch New Video: Bellows Breath Practice

Watch New Video: Bellows Breath Practice

May 24, 2012

This breathing exercise helps provide the body with maximum oxygen, reduces toxins in the body, strengthens the immune system, reduces respiratory tract ailments, aids in blood purification and weight loss. “Bellows Breathing” is the secret to ageless skin and beauty!

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Watch New Video: So Hum Mantra Meditation Practice

May 14, 2012

Stressed out? Need to relax in only a few minutes? Try a short mediation to help quiet your mind and relax your body.

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Watch New Video: Abdominal Breathing Practice

Watch New Video: Abdominal Breathing Practice

Apr 28, 2012

Did you know that learning to breathe from the belly can help you relax, reduce tension in the body and boost an overall sense of well-being? Learn how: Abdominal Breathing Practice.

Read More: The Mindful Body

Feel As Happy As A Pig In Mud!

Apr 27, 2012

Some things can be a happiness catalyst, if only because they nudge us out of a negative rut. Scientists increasingly believe that what we think—both the good stuff and the bad—sculpts our brain circuitry, which, in turn, can reshape our overall outlook. For most humans, channeling positivity is challenging. The limbic system is partially responsible for these negative propensities. Located in the cerebral cortex and subcortex regions of your brain, it includes the hippocampus, which pulls together disparate information to help form memories, and the amygdala, a structure that is a key to recognizing danger. Fearful memories are embedded in the brain so we learn from those situations and take pains to avoid them in the future. How can the average human summon a lighter attitude in the face of all this seemingly preordained negativity? The same way you build up your biceps by doing curls, you can also shore up your capacity for hopefulness by consciously seeking out and concentrating on happy moments. By striving to seek out more upbeat encounters every day and savoring them to the max, you can gradually weave positive experiences into the fabric of your brain. The article then gives suggestions such as “4 Easy Ways to Bring on the Calm” and “The 15-second Happiness Trick”.

Source: Self Magazine

Go With the Flow

Go With the Flow

Apr 23, 2012

Grant us the serenity to accept the things we cannot change, the courage to change the things we can, and the wisdom to read this article about why we should quit being so darn rigid. The mind takes great comfort in familiarity, that can be a good thing, since thinking in familiar patterns saves time. But those worn-down tracks can also result in "psychological stuckness," and that's not good. Being inflexible can stop you from moving forward in other, more profound ways. This article gives advice for how to become more mentally flexible: 1. Relax your grip – Rigidity can be rooted in fear of being hurt or the need to be in control. People who are psychologically flexible are more able to enjoy life as it is, stay in the moment and cope better with life's challenges. So relax and ask yourself to just accept the present and roll with it. 2. Bend a little - For any kind of relationship to be successful, flexibility is key. 3. Learn to let go – Inflexible ideas don't just cause trouble in relationships: They can damage your self-esteem. Realize that you can’t change another person, but you can change yourself – and your reactions. You have to learn to expect the unexpected. 4.Stretch yourself - Most of us can't force our personalities to pretzel themselves into the psychological equivalent of the lotus position overnight. But there are tricks to loosening up faster. If you want to learn to be more flexible, put yourself in a situation where you have to be flexible. A new challenge will often unlock a new mind-set.

Source: Ladies Home Journal

How to Find the Kind of Joy That Lasts

Apr 23, 2012

Now, don't get excited—but do get happy. Martha Beck explains the all-important difference between feeling thrilled, exhilarated, and crazed. Excitement is a great and necessary thing; without it life wouldn't be complete. But happiness—real happiness—is something entirely different, at once calmer and more rewarding. When a gift recipient or jackpot winner starts shaking, screaming, or hyperventilating, we call it happiness, but actually it's evidence that their neurological fight-or-flight mechanism has been triggered. Switching on this mechanism switches off the physiological processes that allow us to relax, connect, and absorb joyful experience. What's more, high excitement is often followed by a mood crash. Afterward we may go through a phase of feeling lifeless and depressed. True joy lacks the wild ups and downs of an excitement-based life. It's a peaceful landscape, filled with peaceful thoughts and peaceful emotions. Indeed, it's so peaceful that, to our adrenaline-soaked culture, it looks rather plain. In fact, I like to think of it as the plains of peace. “Be Here Now” One method to force your brain to be still and truly enjoy the present – without heightened excitement is to create something. creative work causes us to secrete dopamine, a hormone that can make us feel absorbed and fulfilled without feeling manic. The aftermath of a creative surge, especially one that involves a new skill, is a sense of accomplishment and increased self-efficacy—which psychologists recognize as an important counter to depression. Pay attention to this process, and you'll see that the motivation to be here now will gradually grow stronger than the cultural pressure to seek excitement. You'll find yourself increasingly able to tune in to the delights of the present even when you're not actively creating. When this happens, you'll be on your way to genuine happiness: abundant, sustainable delight in the beautiful moments of ordinary life.

Source: Oprah Magazine

Watch New Video: Breath Counting Meditation

Watch New Video: Breath Counting Meditation

Apr 11, 2012

Tired of your chattering mind and continuous internal dialog? Take a break: Breath Counting Meditation

Read More: The Mindful Body