Food Articles Q3 2011(7)

Get juiced

Sep 13, 2011

Grab a glass and drink your way to clear skin, a slim waist and good health. The research is clear that eating antioxidant-packed produce can decrease the odds of getting many conditions--from digestive woes and skin problems to diabetes and cancer. <strong>Why raw is right on:</strong> Do you load your plate with greens as often as possible? Experts say you might not be getting all the nutrients those vegetables offer if you are cooking them. That's because heat destroys some nutrients and enzymes, says Michael Murray, N.D., author of The Complete Book of Juicing: Your Delicious Guide to Youthful Vitality. He notes that cooking vegetables can destroy up to 97 percent of vitamins B and C, and up to 40 percent of vitamins A, D, E and K. The pasteurization process used for packaged juices also kills nutrients and enzymes, he says. "If you don't eat enough raw foods, you're not getting adequate cancer-fighting phytonutrients like free-radical-scavenging carotenes and alkalizing chlorophyll and anti-viral flavonoids," says Murray. To reduce my risk of chronic disease, he suggests I eat So percent of my daily vegetables (five to seven 1/2-cup servings) and fruits (one to two 1/2-cup servings) raw. "Fresh juices are an excellent way to get a concentrated shot of plant- based nutrients in a readily absorbable form," he says. Because juicers break down the indigestible fiber's cell wall, the nutrients inside are released and immediately absorbed by your own cells. What to Juice? The great thing about juicing is that you can toss just about anything into your machine. <strong>What to juice?</strong> The great thing about juicing is that you can toss just about anything into your machine. Here's what to reach for, based on your needs. Vegetables - Beets detox the liver and purify the blood - Broccoli boosts immunity - Carrots stave off the signs of aging and cancer, and aid digestion and eye health. - Celery helps lower blood pressure - Fennel soothes digestive distress - Kale boosts bone density - Parsley eases digestion and detoxifies - Romaine lettuce lowers blood pressure - Spinach increases mental functioning - Wheatgrass eases eczema, ulcers, anemia, arthritis and high blood pressure. Fruits - Apples move toxins out of your body - Blueberries lower inflammation - Blackberries boost heart health - Grapefruit staves off cancer - Lemon detoxifies your liver - Oranges fight infection - Pear relieves constipation (pears are full of fiber); boosts liver and bladder health. - Raspberries lower breast cancer risk - Strawberries ward off Alzheimer's Disease, allergies and high cholesterol and enhance sleep

Source: Natural Health Magazine

High-Protein Vegan Eating: The New Atkins?

Aug 18, 2011

A veggie centric twist on Atkins-style eating gives a whole new meaning to the notion of sustainable weight loss. The Atkins-like herbivore diet sources proteins exclusively from plants and limits refined carbohydrates such as white rice and pasta. Dr. Jenkins and his team sought to replicate the Atkins ratio -- around plants. Since protein takes a bit longer than refined carbs to digest, it does seem to be better at curbing appetite. Veggie protein can provide all the amino acids (aka protein building blocks) the body needs, contrary to charges that vegan diets are nutritionally deficient. Although a pound of beans doesn't deliver the equivalent number of amino acids as a pound of beef, when you eat a variety of plant-based protein sources, they add up throughout the day to make a complete protein. Diet is based primarily on protein from wheat gluten (seitan), soy, and nuts such as almonds, pistachios, and macadamias, the diet also counts on vegetables relatively high in protein, such as broccoli, cauliflower, and spinach. Like the traditional Atkins diet, the green version minimizes carb-heavy foods such as bread, potatoes, and rice, although some unrefined starches are allowed: Moderate amounts of the fibrous grains barley and oat bran are okay because they don't cause blood sugar levels to spike. Several recipes are included.

Source: Whole Living Magazine

The Macrobiotic Diet

The Macrobiotic Diet

Aug 14, 2011

Macrobiotics, despite its radical reputation, it's a very healthy diet with an emphasis on local, seasonal whole foods and mindful eating. The idea is a simple one: Eat in balance ... with the seasons, with your body's needs, with nature. You begin by putting the foods you eat in energetic order and learning to use those foods to balance out all the other stressors you have going in your life, whether physical, mental, emotional or even spiritual. It's really a way of life, not a diet (bordering on an almost spiritual practice). Consider a food's nutrient profile (Is it rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients) and a food's energetic quality (how it affects your physical, emotional and mental well-being). Every food has an inherent vibe, which may be cooling, uplifting, relaxed and expansive (yin) or warming, grounding, active and contracting (yang) -- it's a spectrum -- and you make your choices from it to balance your current condition. Eating seasonally is a simple way to stay in equilibrium. But there is a lot of other things to consider, such as cooking methods, climate, storage and agricultural practices.

Source: Natural Health Magazine

Diet for a Healthy Planet

Aug 14, 2011

Article discusses how vegetarianism is one way to practice ahimsa, the yogic principle of non-harming. People who have taken on this eating style report a significant shift in their mood and emotions, along with a general lightness of being on the yoga mat—feeling more fluidity of movement. But you also need to make sure that you're getting enough of the key nutrients such as protein, iron, calcium, and B-12 vitamins. If you haven't yet made the switch to a plant-based diet but are curious, you might want to consider trying it for a month, or even one day a week. Meatless Monday, for example, a popular initiative backed by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, works to inspire Americans to do just that for the sake of their health and that of the planet.

Source: Yoga Journal

The top power foods for you

The top power foods for you

Jul 22, 2011

What to eat (and not to eat) to feel peppier, sharper, more svelte, and simply better all over. - To boost energy: eat more iron rich foods, such red meats, fish, poultry, soybeans, lentils, spinach, and fortified cereals. - To feel calm: reduce refined carbs—foods high in white flour (cookies, sugary cereals, white bread, etc.) and stripped of nutrients and fiber that normally keep your blood sugar stable. Base meals and snacks around lean protein, healthy fats, and unrefined carbohydrates (i.e. brown rice, whole-grain bread, fruits, and veggies). - To get sharp: a lack of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12—both brain-boosting nutrients—could be to blame. Try eating omega-3-rich fish like mackerel, trout, herring, tuna, and salmon. Or, to get more B12, try fortified breakfast cereal, liver, cooked clams, yogurt, cheese, whole eggs, and ham. - To beat bloat: veggies and legumes are great for you, but certain ones can produce lots of gas, leaving you with major bloat. Try halving the amount of bloat-boosting veggies you normally eat for a week to see if that helps. Don’t cut them out completely, though. - To curb cramps: cramps could mean you’re low on electrolytes like potassium or magnesium.

Source: Health Magazine

The 13 Biggest Myths Busted

Jul 22, 2011

Why do some nutrition myths die and others keep bouncing back, even in the face of what seems to be incontrovertible evidence that they are not true? A balanced diet, enough sleep and regular exercise are usually the best course for fighting diseases and staying healthy, but that just isn’t as interesting to people. 13 myths: 1. "Eggs are bad for your heart.” - eggs do contain a substantial amount of cholesterol in their yolks—about 211 milligrams (mg) per large egg. However, for most of us the cholesterol we eat—in eggs or any other food—doesn’t have a huge impact on raising our blood cholesterol; the body simply compensates by manufacturing less cholesterol itself. The chief heart-disease culprits are saturated and trans fats, which have much greater impact on raising blood cholesterol. Your goal should really be to limit your cholesterol intake to less than 300 mg daily (works out to less than an egg a day). 2. “High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) is worse for you than sugar.” - In short, it seems to be no worse—but also no better—than sucrose, or table sugar. The American Heart Association recently recommended that we consume no more than 100 calories a day in added sugars (HFCS and sucrose) 3. “Carbohydrates make you fat.” - there’s nothing inherently fattening about carbohydrates. It’s eating too many calories, period, that makes you fat. When you cut out so-called “good-carb” foods, such as whole grains, beans, fruits and vegetables, you’re missing out on your body’s main source of fuel as well as vital nutrients and fiber. What’s more, for many people, a low-carb diet may be harder to stick with in the long run. 4. “A raw-food diet provides enzymes that are essential to healthy digestion.” - raw foods are unprocessed so nothing is taken away; you don’t get the nutrient losses that come with cooking. It’s true that heating a food above 118°F inactivates plant enzymes, since enzymes are proteins and proteins denature [break down] with heat. But those enzymes are denatured—and thus inactivated—when they reach our stomachs. Our stomach acids are designed to break down proteins very efficiently. Plant enzymes might reach the small intestine intact, but their overall contribution to human digestion appears minimal. 5. “Your body can’t use the protein from beans unless you eat them with rice.” - experts used to say that to get what your body needs to make proteins, you needed to pair plant-based foods with complementary sets of amino acids, like rice and beans. Now they know that you don’t have to eat those foods at the same meal. If you get a variety of foods throughout the day, they all go into the ‘basket’ of amino acids that are available for the body to use. 6. “Calories eaten at night are more fattening than those eaten early in the day.” - calories are calories are calories, and it doesn’t matter what time you eat them. What matters are the total calories you take in. 7. “I have a weight problem because I eat foods like wheat or dairy that my body can’t process.” - this theory is, in fact, “illogical,” the inability to “process” foods, would mean the foods are not metabolized and calories would not be absorbed. This would lead to weight loss, not gain. It is an example of how the term ‘food allergy’ has become misused and distorted to be associated with anything unpleasant surrounding eating. 8. “Radiation from microwaves creates dangerous compounds in your food.” - Radiation” simply refers to energy that travels in waves and spreads out as it goes. Microwaves used to cook foods are many, many times weaker than X-rays and gamma rays. The types of changes that occur in microwaved food as it cooks are from heat generated inside the food, not the microwaves themselves. Microwave cooking is really no different from any other cooking method that applies heat to food. 9. “Microwaving zaps nutrients.” - it’s the heat and the amount of time you’re cooking that affect nutrient losses, not the cooking method. The longer and hotter you cook a food, the more you’ll lose certain heat- and water-sensitive nutrients, especially vitamin C and thiamin. 10. “You crave certain foods because you’re deficient in one of the nutrients they provide.” – Nope - food cravings tend to be more about satisfying emotional needs. There is one nutrient deficiency that’s clearly associated with cravings in humans: iron. But instead of longing for iron-rich liver or steak, people severely deficient in iron stores tend to crave things like ice cubes, clay or even cement. 11. “Grazing on mini meals throughout the day keeps your metabolism stoked and helps you control your weight better than eating fewer, larger meals.” - Our metabolisms rev up slightly each time we eat, as our bodies process what we’ve consumed. So by having many mini meals instead of fewer, larger ones, we shift our metabolism into a higher gear more often—and burn a few more calories. But the calorie difference is so small it doesn’t add up to a hill of beans. Bottom line: Choose the eating pattern that works best for you. 12. "It’s important to fast periodically, to cleanse toxins from your body." - the truth: Your body has its own elegantly designed system for removing toxins—namely, the liver, kidneys and spleen. There isn’t any evidence that not eating —or consuming only juice— for any period of time makes them do this job any better. 13. “Anyone can benefit from a gluten-free diet: it can give you more energy and even treat autism.” - those without a medical need to avoid gluten shouldn’t expect such results. When it comes to autism, however, the case isn’t so clear-cut.

Source: Eating Well Magazine

Feed a Cold

Aug 31, 2011

The right foods have the ability to support our immune system by providing the nutrients it needs to thrive. What's more, a healthy immune system isn't important just in cold season; evidence suggests that it can help protect you from a host of chronic diseases as well. The following 10 foods are must-haves in an immunity-boosting diet. They all contain key nutrients that have a demonstrable effect on the body's ability to stay healthy: 1. Strawberries 2. Kefir 3. Kale 4. Oats 5. Almond butter 6. Beans 7. Matcha 8. Black rice 9. Milk 10. Pumpkin seeds

Source: Yoga Journal